Open Internet for Democracy

Open Internet for Democracy

Our Belief: An open and accessible Internet is fundamental to the success of democratic societies worldwide.

Our Goal: Build a network of open Internet advocates who champion the democratic values and principles that should guide the future development of the Internet.

Latest Updates

Latest Updates

 

Read the Democratic Principles for an Open Internet

The Center for International Private Enterprise (CIPE), the National Democratic Institute (NDI), and the Center for International Media Assistance (CIMA) are facilitating an initiative to identify and promote internet norms and principles essential to democratic governance. Success requires the diverse voices of a wide range of local and multinational organizations, including political and human rights groups, citizen activists, media representatives, civil society organizations, and members of the private sector. 

The Democratic Principles for an Open Internet have been primarily designed for citizens and civil society organizations in fragile and emerging democracies, who are new to the digital rights space, are beginning to engage more regularly online, and who may be more likely to encounter deliberate internet disruptions as a result of government interference. We hope this guide will help activists working for democracy in an internet age and connect them in global peer networks to exchange best practices. The guide also serves as an advocacy tool that organizations can utilize in pushing governments, the private sector, and civil society to adhere to universal human rights through open internet principles and standards.

Read the Principles!

 

News

The beginning of February was marked by a pivotal case in which the District Court of The Hague declared the Dutch legislation regarding an algorithmic risk assessment model – the System Risk Indication (SyRI) – to be in violation of the right to privacy. SyRI, enacted through legislation in 2014, enabled the analysis of 17 different categories of an individual’s personal data, ranging from employment history and property records to their health insurance information and amount of debt.  The February ruling comes after policy and human rights advocates questioned whether individuals subject to the algorithm’s analysis knew they were under such surveillance, and whether SyRI’s “findings” led in fact to further discrimination of those already facing marginalization in society.
The Need to Understand Our Digital Rights in Our Own Languages
The fight towards a free and democratic internet has numerous battlefields, but equally important is the creation of a network representative of different cultures and societies and in compliance with human rights standards. 
As Botswana Heads to the Polls, Competitive Elections Highlight Need to Strengthen Media and Data Laws
An electorate ought to be empowered to make their own political and socio-economic decisions, and as such, a public sphere where information is transmitted, received and debated should be protected and augmented by policy-makers as a bipartisan issue to guard against any potential anti-democratic forces that technological proliferation has the potential to foster, particularly in times of heightened pressure including elections. Botswana, often heralded as the so-called “African poster child”, is no exception.
The Role of Multi-stakeholder Coalitions in the fight against Digital Rights Violations
With a marked increase in digital rights violations across the African continent since 2016, citizens have found various ways to protest against governments from using internet restriction as a way to both oppress and repress.
Threats to Democracy Online in the Philippines
How is a lack of multistakeholder discussions, a digital divide, and pro-surveillance legislation impacting the internet in the Philippines?